Skip to main content

About your Search

20120701
20120731
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
-mart and shawn mohler using the internet to draw the biggest fans to small town, illinois. our reporters, wired. that's this week on "press: here." well, good morning, everyone. the word wal-mart conjures up any number of images. it can mean low prices or a certain socioeconomic position. what wal-mart is behind the scenes anyway is one of the most innovative companies in america. it's this man who's doing the innovating. the head of wal-mart labs. now, his office in silicon valley look nothing like a wal-mart. in fact, the closest wal-mart retail store is 17 miles away, across the san francisco bay in oakland. but it's here where roger rahman thinks of the future of retailing, particularly online. now, he has his work cut out for him. wal-mart may be the biggest retailer in the real world, but amazon is the biggest retailer online. amazon's success thanks in large part to roger hman. he's a former amazon executive. his ideas are behind much of that company's success. rahman sold his latest company to wal-mart which is how he finds himself in the latest position. he's one of the earliest invest
the bread basket, the section of the u.s. that feeds its share of the world, is burning up right now. the worst conditions they've seen since 1956. the governor of illinois says his state has never seen anything like this. he calls it a disaster of epic proportions. over one-third of the u.s. corn crop is in big trouble. over half the country is now affected. the problem is forecasters can't point to any rain on the way. it is where we begin this evening with nbc's kevin tibbles in walker, iowa tonight. kevin, good evening. >> reporter: brian, this is corn country and it is parched. these would usually be fully formed ears of corn by now. in this state they're pretty much worthless. and farmers at the grain elevator behind me in walker say they know their yields are going to be way down this year. many are starting to wonder whether they'll get any crop in at all. many farmers are throwing up their hands and looking to the heavens. >> we've done all we can do and it's up to the good lord to supply the water and send it on time. >> reporter: more than half the country, 55%, is now in
from passengers on a flight from new york to madrid. tom costello covers aviation for us. tom, how are you? >> reporter: good morning. delta flight to madrid, 206 passengers on board. it left new york at 8:00 but soon after turned back to jfk and escorted to a remote location on the runway after a passenger spotted something that looked very suspicious. on the floor of a lavatory, a straw with wires in it. the crew notified on board air marshals and then a female passenger began having difficulty breathing as she pointed out another male passenger she thought was the last person into the lavatory. the male passenger denied going to the rest room or having anything to do with the wires but the air marshals and crew became concerned that the female passenger might be part of a diversion. listen to the pilot talking to the tower when they were on the ramp but before police boarded the plane. >> we have a lady that is on oxygen that the flight attendants want paramedics for, but we think she's the one that is supposed to be the decoy to keep looking at the gentleman that was playing wi
, often in water. in chicago tourists found a new use for the iconic bean sculpture. shade from the sun. >> what did you think when you saw the shade? >> oh, let me in there. let me in there. >> this is really cool. guys did a good job. >> literally cool. >> it is cool here. >> reporter: a few blocks away heat buckled the pavement. >> this is happening across the country from wisconsin to texas. you're seeing streets buckling all over the place. >> reporter: in st. louis where it broke 100 degrees for the eighth straight day air conditioning repairmen worked overtime. >> i worked yesterday. >> reporter: today more record highs. at least 20 cities from atlanta to as far north as wisconsin. forecasters say relief may be just around the corner. >> we are looking at this pattern change to take place by the end of this weekend and certainly by the beginning of next week. it's going to feel much more comfortable especially for the middle of the country. >> reporter: hundreds of thousands of people remain without power after last week's storms. outside washington, d.c. most of lisa's neighbors
on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer, #madtweets. send jim an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. another cup of coffee? how long is this one going to last? forty-five minutes? an hour? well... listen. 5-hour energy lasts a whole lot of hours. take one in the afternoon, and you'll feel alert and energized 'til the cows come home. it's packed with b-vitamins and nutrients to make it last. so what's it going to be, partner? 5-hour energy. wise choice. 5-hour energy. hours and hours of energy. well another great thing about all this walking i've been doing is that it's given me time to reflect on some of life's biggest questions. like, if you could save hundreds on car insurance by making one simple call, why wouldn't you make that call? see, the only thing i can think of is that you can't get any... bars. ah, that's better. it's a beautiful view. i wonder if i can see mt. rushmore from here. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. but kate still looks like...kate. [ female an
to collect bras for people in women's shelters. they want gently-used bras or new ones. that's often one thing those shelters don't get. >> they are very expensive, bras are. they are happy to collect those at soma boutique. >> we have a bin we can throw them in. see if we can make it. >> i don't feel lucky today. >> yes, you are. can i tell you why i'm so excited today? >> why? >> there's a guy on our show named paul sykes. >> you're psyched. >> i'm psyched! one day i went to nashville and they have a bluebird cafe where they have singers, some are accomplished, some are new. they perform and you watch. >> they sit with their guitar and piano and sing a song. >> i was with friends of mine. i listened and cried. we are starting a segment called "spotlight today". >> this is what i took with my iphone. let's try to enjoy it. you can't hear it or see it, but you'll hear and see him in a little while. >> i just met him on the steps. he seems very psyched to be here. >> he'll be singing a beautiful love song. >> "my epitaph." i'll be on the lookout for talented people. don't audition or send
with that. mark potter, thank you so much. 7:18. here is natalie. >>> so many used social media sites to stay in touch with friends. now a growing number of police departments are turning to them to help solve crimes. nbc justice correspondent pete williams has details. good morning, pete. >> reporter: this is the version to generate tips from the old days of wanted posters to crime stoppers on television, now social media. twitter, facebook and increasingly youtube. sheriff's deputies in hillsboro county, florida wanted to find a man who stole a canned drink and used it to attack this convenience store clerk. they posted the surveillance video on youtube. someone who recognized the attacker called in the tip. within two days he was arrested and has since pleaded guilty. just this week, police in akron, ohio wanted to know who was using stolen credit cars to buy things at local stores. they posted this surveillance video hoping to generate tips. it's part of a growing trend, police expanding their reach using social media to assist investigations. maryland posted this video vo of a fl
on, girls. >> reporter: it's a routine karen is used to -- feeding her cows -- but this usually happens later in the year -- october or november -- after the grass is gone. her pastures have never been this brown and barren this early. >> it's just devastating. it looks like what i count the desert. >> reporter: she has sold off 100 of her 250-head herd because she can't afford to feed them. the most severe drought in the state's history could soon claim her livelihood of three decades. >> if no significant rain comes, i'll have to go out of business. i just don't have any grass and won't be able to afford the hay prices. >> reporter: while government scientists say more than half the country is in some form of drought, this entire state is dry. farm equipment sits idle. there's nothing to cut and bale. the only real activity is at the sales auction, ranchers selling off cattle, a move experts say could raise beef prices by 10% over the next year. >> the bottom line is if we don't have cattle to produce calves then we're not going to have a calf crop. >> reporter: in a dozen yea
in washington. what can you tell us? >> good evening. by the way atlanta set an all time high of 106. we thought it would get a couple of degrees cooler. it didn't. once again atlanta hit 106. it took the city 32 years to break that all time record but only one day to tie it. it is simply amazing. in louisville, kentucky four consecutive days with 100 degree heat. all record breakers. how about an outside sauna. in south carolina the heat index of 116. planning a break on monday with temperatures still 5 to 10 degrees above average. on july 4th the core of heat shifts west. this evening there is another cluster of storms in some of the same spots that got hit hard on friday. they knocked out power to 200,000 customers in chicago. winds were clocked at 80 miles per hour. unlike that cluster it is much smaller and showing no signs of growth both promising signs. if they make it to d.c. it would be after midnight if they make it here. they would be much weaker. >> thanks so much. >>> out west tonight firefighters are gaining ground on that massive wildfire burning in colorado. at this hour 57 major
yields. not as much risk as we're used to seeing. it's how low bonds have gone in yield and how high they've gone in price. i have never seen anything like this. 31 years, we haven't seen anything like it. eaton bottomed yesterday. you simply discovered the terrific industrial is in stronger shape than it should be and it's got a much better yield than treasuries. why not wait? meanwhile, many of the oils share that characteristic. yielding 4%, conoco or incana or kinder morgan partners. you can accept you're going to lose a little money, but not a lot of money. these companies pay you to wait. you're betting europe is not suicidal when you buy something with a 4% yield and they'll come up with a solution eventually for the dissolution of one of the largest and most important markets on earth, spain. plus, it's pretty clear we may actually have a bottom in natural gas. as it's held the $2 level and bounced to a $3 number, thanks to a huge number of shut-ins and a dramatic decline in drilling. that's what a bottom looks like. supply no longer is exceeding demand. same goes for the high yie
his personal finances and investment accounts and in the end is this what voters care about? with us senior adviser to the romney campaign, ed gillespie. then, the tax fight for the fall. will rates go up? and for whom? the president sets up a fight over the middle class. >> the fate of the tax cuts for the wealthiest americans will be decided by the outcome of the next election. my opponent will fight to keep them in place. i will fight -- >> a debate here this morning with two key senators, assistant democratic leader senator dick durbin of illinois and assistant republican senator jon kyl of arizona. and our political roundtable later, with insights and analysis, including the veepstakes for mr. romney. with us, republican strategist mike murphy. president of the naacp, ben jealous. anti-tax activist grover norquist. "washington post" associate editor bob woodward and democratic strategist hilary rosen. also this morning, a few minutes with bob costas of nbc sports, on the penn state sex abuse scandal. after this week's devastating report about who knew what, and when. >>> good mo
the highest tax rate of all of the industrialized countries. that makes us very uncompetitive. >> are you speaking about the olympics? are you concerned about our athletes wearing a uniforms that were made in china? >> again, i go back to -- let's don't politicize the olympics. let's look at why an american business felt it hood to buy those products, because they were cheaper than the ones he could make here. it's because of government policies here that make it more expensive to do business in the united states. >> so you're okay with ralph lauren? >> i'm not going to politicize it. i want to talk about the issue. the underlying issue is why did we make it so hard for american businesses to compete that they have to buy things from abroad? >> senator, go ahead. >> david, let me tell you, the bottom line is this, the outsourcing of jobs by bain capital to low-wage countries is an embarrassment to mitt romney and he's trying to distance himself from his own company that made millions of dollars for him. i would say to senator kyl, i hope that this week the senate republicans will join the
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)